In tweets: academic economics reckons with its discriminatory culture

Here’s as comprehensive a summary of events and reactions as I can manage on vacation, currently in a cabin in a Tasmanian national park. I think it is important to consider these events in the context of the #MeToo movement broadly and Alice Wu’s paper on the latent toxicity of academic economics, which I cannot adequately summarize in this space.

I approach this topic not with any familiarity, but with frustration and regret that experiences like mine have been deprived from others just as enthusiastic and qualified (in many cases surely more so) as I am. This post is just me documenting a critical turning point in my chosen line of work using my two main strengths: a tendency to fixate on projects and topics I care about and spending time on Twitter.

Click through to read on.

Read More

What I've been reading, featuring Mitski, Milkman, and the Mekong Review

  • Be the Cowboy by Mitski is the best album of 2018, according to Consequence of Sound, Vulture, and The Line of Best Fit. It ranks #2 for the New York Times and NPR. (Update: also #1 for Pitchfork)

    • I was at the same London show as the Best Fit writer. I would venture a guess that at least a third of the crowd were LGBTQ couples, which was surprising because Mitski’s music neither lyrically nor sonically make for an obvious union of indie and queer subcultures. Even within the broad indie rock genre, hers is a less accessible sound, her last album Puberty 2 pretty much defined by its distorted guitar (the Guardian recently called her work “the emotional Tough Mudder of indie rock.”) But it did move me to try to re-read her lyrics while there and with her manic choreography, it made for a fun crowd; a pair of brothers in front of me hugged and high-fived in excitement between songs and fist pumped during choruses.

    • I find myself liking a lot of Mitski-adjacent musicians but neither Puberty 2 nor this album have quite hit the spot for me. That said, I do recommend “Geyser” and “Two Slow Dancers” off this album and “Your Best American Girl” off Puberty 2 was one of my favorite songs of 2016. There’s a great episode of the Song Exploder podcast about the last one

    • Mitski on the Daily Show in September: "The cowboy myth is so appealing to me especially because I'm an Asian woman. That idea of not having to apologize is so American: riding into town, wrecking shit, and then walking out like he's the hero."

  • “Milkman” by Anna Burns (h/t Helena for this month’s book club selection)

    • I found it a chore to get through and what little action takes place is usually accompanied by the narrator’s lengthy and purposely anti-climactic tangents that remove the reader from the action for several unindented pages at a time

    • My reading of the depicted setting divided characters into “shinies”—those made to be outcasts by often harmless idiosyncrasies—and characters who personify the oppressive and violent setting of the time speaking and acting like video-game NPCs, working collectively as a shame-weaponizing ecosystem to combat the shinies in a manner I think I will be the first to compare to the Shimmer in Annihilation. The novel eschews names for its characters and the defining events, parties, and even countries and cities of its 1970s Troubles setting, which to me contributed to a compellingly sinister and hyper-simplified, almost science-fictionalized version of a specific place in history. Most in my book club saw it as far more realistically grounded than I did, but I really prefer the Cary Fukunaga/Hiro Murai-inspired television adaptation that played in my head while reading. It’s sinister and disturbing at times—it is a book about a predatory and violent society—and yet almost delightfully weird at other points.

    • Overall, I would hesitate to recommend because of the effort required to read it even though the writing is bleakly funny in several places. I’ve already told a friend to deprioritize it on his reading list, but at the same time, its selection has improved my opinion of the Man Booker committee.

  • Australian news channel ABC interviewed Minh Bui Jones, editor of the remarkable Mekong Review (audio). At just over three years old, the Southeast Asia-focused literary quarterly is thriving.

    • New York Times profile from last year:

      Minh Bui Jones… saw the magazine as a vehicle for cross-border connections in a region that lacks a sense of a shared historical narrative.

      According to Mr. Bui Jones, it also aims to be for Southeast Asia what he said The New York Review of Books and The London Review of Books had been since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001: “brave, trenchant critics of their respective governments.”

      Mekong Review is a long shot on many levels, not least because it covers a region where English literacy is patchy, postal systems are unreliable and newspapers that are not controlled by governments tend to struggle against censorship and chronic financial constraints.

      …Then he must arrange delivery of the magazine’s 2,000-copy print run to Southeast Asian cities that are hundreds of miles apart. Mr. Bui Jones said he has an ad hoc distribution system that relies on friends who “mule” copies by plane, bus, tuk tuk and motorbike, and that he also moonlights as a deliveryman when he visits the region.

  • Twitter and caste-based discrimination

  • John D. Dingell, the longest-running member of Congress in American history, calls for publicly funded campaigns and the abolition of the Senate

  • Doc Rivers reflects on 20 years as a head coach in the NBA, a league notorious for its trigger-happiness in firing coaches and—despite its relative progressiveness—the dearth of black coaches for a league where most coaches are former players and 80% of players are black:

“We have a lot of black players without fathers. And to me that’s a story that needs to be talked about, because it’s difficult for the black coach sometimes. The black male figures in a lot of these guys’ lives have burned them. So, being coached by us, some people think it’s easier when actually it’s harder.”

  • Time lapse of the 32 days of filming required to shoot the sushi scene in Wes Anderson’s stop-motion Isle of Dogs (2018):

 
 

And the final product, one of my favorite scenes of the year: